About

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Who is Laurence O’Bryan?
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I am an author and survivor. I grew up in Ireland. That means I have strong opinions about a lot of things. My roots go back to a small estate deep in the Mountains of Mourne, near the Silent Valley, in County Down, Northern Ireland. This is the view from the back window of the farm house:
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The meadow and the fairy ring

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I went to school in Dublin, drank way too much, studied English and history, then business, then IT at Oxford University. While a student, I worked as a kitchen porter in a club near the Bank of England.
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A few years later I was announced into the main bar at the House of Commons. I was in the company of a famous Chelsea supporter. The champagne was flowing. After that I spent ten years working in the City of London, the creaking hub of world finance. 
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I was first published by a school newspaper when I was ten, for a short story about aliens getting lost. The Istanbul Puzzle was my first novel to be published (Jan 2012), The Jerusalem Puzzle my second (Jan 2013), and The Manhattan Puzzle my third (Oct 2013 – Aug 26 2014 in the US).
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In 2007 I won the Outstanding Novel Submitted award at the Southern California writer’s conference. I missed the award ceremony and only found out after it was over that the agents and editors attending had picked me out of over 300 unpublished novels submitted. The Istanbul Puzzle was the novel they had chosen. The same novel was shortlisted for Irish Crime Novel of 2012, five years later. It has now been translated into 10 languages.
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I am a member of the Irish Writing Centre, the Irish Writers Union, two “live” writing groups in Dublin and I promote other writers through my site BooksGoSocial.com. My research has taken me all over the world, from San Francisco to deep in the Arab world. And I still enjoy looking at the stars and listening to the stories of strangers.
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What keeps you going?
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I know it’s a cliche, but I dreamed of becoming a writer when I was a child telling adventure stories to friends on my street. Two of those friends committed suicide before they reached the age of 21. Ireland was a place of repression, secrets and shame back then. It still is. I dedicate my writing to their memory. 
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My motto? Not All Who Wander Are Lost – Níl gach uile fhánaí caillte.


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