Get Your Writing Noticed: How to grab your reader’s attention!

Posted by on Jul 6, 2012 in On Writing

. A key aspect of writing for the 21st century, applicable to non fiction and fiction, is grabbing the reader’s attention. The number of distractions people have these days was covered in my last post. Here are some techniques for grabbing the reader up front: 1. Establish credibility. If you’re being published by a major publishing house this will help, but even if you’re not you can put your key credential up front. If you spent 20 years as a gardener...

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Old Jerusalem, an ancient city in a modern age

Posted by on Feb 23, 2012 in Research, The Jerusalem Puzzle

Written February 2012 I am spending time in the old city of Jerusalem. If I stay here any longer I’ll probably have to apply for a resident’s permit. And as I am staying in East Jerusalem that may be tricky. My reason for being here, aside from the welcome sun, is to research the next stage of Sean and Isabel’s adventures. If you read The Istanbul Puzzle you’ll probably know that there are a few questions at the end still hanging. The Jerusalem...

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My Summer Read & An Interview with Glenn Meade

Posted by on Jul 23, 2011 in Guest Posts

Glenn Meade is one of the most successful Irish authors of this generation. His novels include the international bestsellers The Sands of Sakarra, Snow Wolf and his latest compelling blockbuster The Second Messiah. Earlier this year I asked Glenn some questions about his writing. Here are his answers: 1. Glenn, when did you become interested in writing, what drove you to write your first book? At age four, as I hid under the dining room table in my grandmother’s home...

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The 3rd Puzzle: Where are the plague pits that mark the beginning of our world?

Posted by on May 26, 2011 in Historical Puzzles

In the sixth century the word’s smallest organism, Yersina Pestis, the bubonic plague bacterium, achieved its greatest growth spike. During the reign of Justinian (Emperor 527 to 565CE) the plague hit Constantinople, the capital of the Roman Empire. Almost every city of the Empire was devastated in an apocalyptic manner. Gibbon (The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire) describes the effect of the epidemic as follows: Justinian’s reign is disgraced by the...

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A Byzantine Romance

Posted by on May 23, 2011 in On Writing

Under the Comnenian family, the ruling family of the Byzantine Empire who halted the decline of Byzantium from 1081 to 1185, Byzantine writers in Constantinople reintroduced the ancient Greek romance novel. Their era, the era of the Crusades, was also reflected in these stories. These novels span the gap between the last surviving romance novels of late antiquity and the early medieval romantic revival. Only four of these novels survive today, just one of which is written...

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